32.1.28 Prevalence of Anemia in Pregnant Women in the Pandemic of Covid-19

Original Article

 

Anemia in Pregnant in Covid-19

Prevalence of Anemia in Pregnant Women in the Pandemic of Covid-19

Urfa Taj1, Mahwish Pervaiz1, Sumreen Shabbir2, Shazia Munir2, Shazia Jabeen2 and Faheema Rasul2

ABSTRACT

Objective: To study the Prevalence of Anemia in pregnant women in the pandemic of COVID-19.

Study Design: Prospective study

Place and Duration of Study: This study was conducted at the Allama Iqbal Memorial Teaching Hospital Sialkot and Sardar Begum Teaching Hospital Sialkot department of Obstetrics and Gynecology during March 2019 to September 2020.

Materials and Methods: Two hundred pregnant women were selected for this study. The history and examination of each woman was conducted and blood was taken for complete blood count (CBC). The informed written consent was taken before examination and sample collection of the pregnant women. The Ethical Committee permission of was considered before collecting the data and get publishing in Medical Journal. The data was analyzed for results by SPSS version 20.

Results: The prevalence of Anemia in pregnant women during COVID-19 was maximum 60(30%) in age group
20-25 years and was minimum 18(09%) in age group 41-44 years. The prevalence of Anemia in pregnant women during COVID-19 was maximum in lower class75 (37.50% and minimum 58(29%) in middle class

The prevalence of Anemia in pregnant women during COVID-19 was maximum 85(42.50%) of Hemoglobin 6-7gm/dl and was minimum 15(07.50%) of Hemoglobin 12-13gm/dl.

Conclusion: It was concluded from the study was that Anemia was prevalent in pregnant women because most of the pregnant women did not come to hospital for Ante natal care. Therefore, iron advised on diet and iron supplement was not received.

Key Words: COVID-19, Prevalence, Anemia and pregnant women

Citation of article: Taj U, Pervaiz M, Shabbir S, Munir S, Jabeen S, Rasul F. Prevalence of Anemia in Pregnant Women in the Pandemic of Covid-19. Med Forum 2021;32(1):115-117.

 

 

INTRODUCTION

Since the first report (December Two thousand nineteen) of the covid-19 disease 2019 caused by severe acute lungs syndrome covid-19, the number of definite cases and associated death and diseases have increased rapidly.1,2 Pregnant ladies are thought a high danger group because of related about the effect of corona virus 19 on them during and after pregnancy, and on their newborn.3 

To provide protection to delivered mothers and their neonates,the key factors to ponder about are,risk factors

 

 

1. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Allama Iqbal Memorial Teaching Hospital Sialkot.

2. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sardar Begum Teaching Hospital Sialkot.

 

 

Correspondence: Dr. Urfa Taj, Assistant Professor Obstetrics & Gynecology, Allama Iqbal Memorial Teaching Hospital Sialkot.

Contact No: 03328677543

Email: urfataj@gmail.com

 

 

Received:  October, 2020

Accepted:  December, 2020

Printed:      January, 2021

 

 

leading to covid-19, Clinical presentation and results of therapy during days of infection.4

Lack enough healthy red blood cells (Anemia) is one of the most common food necessary for health and growth deficiency disorganization affecting the pregnant women; the incidence in developed countries is fourteen percent, in developing countries fifty one percent, and in India, it varies from sixty five percent to seventy five percent.1,2, 5-10

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Two hundred pregnant women were selected for this study. The history examination of each woman was conducted and blood was taken for CBC. The informed written consent was taken before examination and sample collection of the pregnant women. The permission of Ethical Committee was taken before collecting the data and gets publishing in Medical Journal. The data was analyzed for results by SPSS version 20.

RESULTS

The prevalence of Anemia in pregnant women during COVID-19 was maximum 60(30%) in age group 20-25 years and was minimum 18(09%) in age group 41-44 years as shown in table 1.

Table No.1: Age distribution

Sr #

Age (years)

Number of cases

Percentage %

1

20-25

60

30 %

2

26-30

55

27.50%

3

31-35

45

22.50%

4

36-40

22

11.00%

5

41-44

18

09%

Total

200

100%

The prevalence of Anemia in pregnant women during COVID-19 was maximum in lower class75 (37.50% and minimum 58(29%) in middle class as shown in table no 2.

1 Middle class

2 Working class

3 Lower class

Table No.2: Socio Economic status distribution

Sr #

Socio Economic status

Number of cases

age %

1

High gentry

58

29%

2

Middle class

67

33.50%

3

Poor class

75

37.50%

Total

200

100%

The prevalence of Anemia in pregnant women during COVID-19 was maximum 85(42.50%) of Hemoglobin 6-7gm/dl and was minimum 15(07.50%) of Hemoglobin  12-13gm/dl as shown in table no 3.

Table No.3: Hemoglobin distribution in pregnant women during COVID-19

Sr #

Hemoglobin (gm/dl) distribution

Number of cases

age %

1

6-7

85

42.50%

2

8-9

75

37.50%

3

10-11

25

12.50%

4

12-13

15

07.50%

Total

200

100%

DISCUSSION

However, lower incidence was noted from Nepal (forty two point five percent) and Haryana (fifty one percent) and National Family Health Survey-2 and 3 (forty nine point seven percent). 

Lack enough healthy red blood cells between the patients in the present study was low (two point three percent) which was coincided to work by Kapil and Sareen (one point six percent) and National Family Health Survey (two point five percent).[13] Whereas other works showed higher incidence; Totega (13.1%), Agarwal et al. (9.2%), Vivek et al. (7%), and Gautam 
et al.4,7,11,12

Maternal anemia is considered as risk factor for both the mothers and fetus. Available results from India shows that mother disease rates are higher in anesmic ladies.[2,9,15] In the recent work, about thirty five point six percent of the ladies had mother and fetal disease, Lower segment Cesarian section.[10]

In the recent work, around twenty five percent of ladies delivered low birth new born; the majority of them (fifty seven percent) were among ladies with Lack enough healthy red blood cells.

Whereas Marahatta in Nepal noted three percent before time deliveries in anemic women.[1]

In the present study, gravida, education of pregnant women, and bad obstetric history were significantly associated with anemia. A study by Chowdhury et al. observed an insignificant association between anemia and gravida.[16,17]

In a similar work done by Obse et al. in Ethiopia parity > 5 has a significant association with anemia.[18,19, 20]

Lack enough healthy red blood cells (Anemia) is highly incident worldwide, too large or too small harming babies and ladies of generative age 21. Decreased iron stores for the baby, which may lead to impaired development. Iron deficiency is considered the most common cause of anemia, but there are other nutritional and non-nutritional causes. The anemia prevalence for the population is used to classify the public health significance of the problem.

CONCLUSION

It was concluded from the study was that Anemia was prevalent in pregnant women because most of the pregnant women did not come to hospital for Ante natal care. Therefore, iron advised on diet and iron supplement was not received.

Author’s Contribution:

Concept & Design of Study:

Urfa Taj

Drafting:

Mahwish Pervaiz, Sumreen Shabbir

Data Analysis:

Shazia Munir, Shazia Jabeen, Faheema Rasul

Revisiting Critically:

Urfa Taj, Mahwish Pervaiz

Final Approval of version:

Urfa Taj

Conflict of Interest: The study has no conflict of interest to declare by any author.

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